Last edited by Grocage
Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

1 edition of The U.S. Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison found in the catalog.

The U.S. Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison

Bob O"Connor

The U.S. Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison

by Bob O"Connor

  • 336 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Infinity Pub. in West Conshohocken, Penn .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Prisoners and prisons,
  • United States. Colored Troops,
  • Andersonville Prison,
  • United States,
  • Registers,
  • Registers of dead,
  • United States. Army,
  • African American troops,
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographic references (p. 97-98) and index.

    Statementby Bob O"Connor
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE612.A5 O18 2009
    The Physical Object
    Pagination103 p. :
    Number of Pages103
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25079197M
    ISBN 100741457679
    ISBN 109780741457677
    LC Control Number2011283090
    OCLC/WorldCa639578435

    Other Civil War Prisons. Allison, Don, ed. Hell on Belle Isle, Diary of a Civil War Banner Publications, Bryant, William O. Cahaba Prison and the Sultana sity of Alabama Press, Derden, John K. The World's Largest Prison: The Story of Camp Lawton.   His current research involves studying the black prisoners held in Confederate prisons during the Civil War. The stereotypes that no black prisoner made it to prison are wrong. In fact, he is only partially through the U.S. Colored Troops records and have found 2, black prisoners ( soldiers and black sailors).

    The Andersonville Raiders were a band of rogue soldiers incarcerated at the Confederate Andersonville Prison during the American Civil by their chieftains – Charles Curtis, John Sarsfield, Patrick Delaney, Teri Sullivan (aka "WR Rickson", according to other sources), William Collins, and A. Munn – these soldiers terrorized their fellow prisoners, stealing their possessions and. Andersonville National Historic Site - the most infamous Civil War Prison - Andersonville prison was the deadliest prisoner of war camp during the Civil War with a total of nea deaths. Over 40% of all Union prisoners of war who died during the Civil War perished at Andersonville.

    The Andersonville prisoner of war camp, which operated from Febru , until the end of the American Civil War in , was one of the most notorious in U.S. history. Underbuilt, overpopulated, and continuously short on supplies and clean water, it was a nightmare for the nea soldiers who entered its walls.   Part 1 of 2. “Andersonville The Untold Story of the Civil War” is a slickly produced, TNT Original Movie that originally aired on March 3rd, It was directed by legendary filmmaker.


Share this book
You might also like
16-19

16-19

In the House of Delegates, Saturday, December 12, 1795.

In the House of Delegates, Saturday, December 12, 1795.

Tables of spectrum lines.

Tables of spectrum lines.

Everyday Writer 3e & i cite

Everyday Writer 3e & i cite

Engineering and development program plan

Engineering and development program plan

Charles M. Suter.

Charles M. Suter.

Guide to the small grants in the creative and performing arts scheme.

Guide to the small grants in the creative and performing arts scheme.

Applied groundwater studies in Africa

Applied groundwater studies in Africa

South Asian arts policy.

South Asian arts policy.

Council of the Rainmakers Address Book

Council of the Rainmakers Address Book

Customs Border Security Act of 2001

Customs Border Security Act of 2001

Dana meets the cow who lost its moo

Dana meets the cow who lost its moo

Zaffer pe sanze

Zaffer pe sanze

The U.S. Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison by Bob O"Connor Download PDF EPUB FB2

The U.S. Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison Paperback – Aug by Bob O'connor (Author)/5(2). Book Overview This is the untold record of the over Union black soldiers who suffered confinement at the infamous Andersonville Prison in Georgia.

The men, representing ten regiments but mostly from the 8th USCT and the 54th Massachusetts Volunteers, were among only USCT prisoners in a war in which overUSCT participated. While this book is intended for a small subset of history buffs and students it's a volume that appeals to anyone interested in the civil war, andersonville prison, or black history.

I purchased and used it for a graduate research paper on black prisoners at andersonville/5. Get this from a library. The U.S. Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison. [Bob O'Connor]. U.S. Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison, 02/02/ An enlightening and concise history of the African-American men and two white officers who fought at Olustee, Fort Pillow, and Petersburg, some of whom were captured and shipped to the infamous Confederate prison camp.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The U. Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison by Bob O'Connor (, Paperback) at the best online prices at eBay.

Free shipping for many products. Bibliography: Andersonville and other Civil War Prisons. The U.S. Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison. Infinity Publishing, The General's Books, Levy, George. To Die in Chicago: Confederate Prisoners at Camp Douglas.

One of the untold stories of the American Civil War is the incarceration of U.S. Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison in Georgia. U.S. Colored Troops were authorized by both the Second Confiscation Act of J (Section 12) and the Militia Act of the same date (Secti The U.S.

Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison book and 15), which authorized the president to accept blacks into the service "for the purpose of. 8th U. COLORED TROOPS KNOWN TO HAVE BEEN PRISONERS AT CAMP SUMTER (ANDERSONVILLE PRISON) Code No: Grave No: Last Name: AMON First Name: CHARLES Rank: PRIVATE Company: I Regiment: 8 State: US COLORED TROOPS Branch Of Service: INFANTRY Date of Death: 10/26/ Cause of Death: SCORBUTUS Remarks* CHARLES ANNON.

Union soldiers in Andersonville prison / The rebel leader, Jeff Davis, at Fortress Monroe / Th. Nast. (Library of Congress) If only black-and-white ("b&w") sources are listed and you desire a copy showing color or tint (assuming the original has any), you can generally purchase a quality copy of the original in color by citing the Call.

Andersonville: Prison Commander Wirz Executed. On April 9,General Robert E. Lee () surrendered his Confederate forces to Ulysses Grant () at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia. His recent book, U.S. Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison, is a tribute to the soldiers who suffered the hardships of one of the most notorious prisons of the Civil War.

O'Connor describes a brief history of African American soldiers dating back to the Revolutionary War and explains Order Number that was set up by the War Department in to establish the Bureau of Colored Troops. His book “The U.S. Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison” includes the biographies of colored soldiers incarcerated in that famous Georgia prison including 47 who were captured at the Battle of Olustee.

The Charles Town, West Virginia author has followed that book up with the study of all the black prisoners in the Civil War. The U.S. Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison”, unlike my other three books, is non-fiction.

It is the account of the black soldiers at the prison and a biography of each. U.S. Army, Register of Enlistments, includes the Civil War era (Union) from National Archives Microfilm Publication M U.S. Colored Troops Military Service Records, ; Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans, overentries Gravestone Photographs for 34 National (Military) Cemeteries.

The U.S. Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison. by Bob O'Connor. Infinity Publishing, West Conshohocken, Pennsylvania. FHL Book: /A2 M2o (title # ) Slave Claims Commission, [edit | edit source] Michael Hait.

I HAVE been asked many times by my friends, and also by members of the Grand Army of the Republic and Women's Relief Corps, to write a book of my army life, during the war ofwith the regiment of the 1st South Carolina Colored Troops, later called 33d United States Colored Infantry.

Andersonville is a novel by MacKinlay Kantor concerning the Confederate prisoner of war camp, Andersonville prison, during the American Civil War (–). The novel was originally published inand won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction the following year. The novel interweaves the stories of real and fictional : MacKinlay Kantor.

Andersonville was a prison for enlisted soldiers; II officers, after the first few months, were confined at Macon. The first contingent of prisoners, men from Belle Isle outside Richmond, arrived at the camp on Februbefore the prison was completed.

In the File Size: 5MB. “The U.S. Colored Troops at Andersonville Prison” is the untold story of black prisoners in that famous Confederate prison.

Since then I am also tracking black prisoners at all the other Confederate prisons (there were 51 prisons) and have found over 2, A book has been published on that topic too. The Further Adventures of Major Archibald Bogle, Thirty-fifth United States Colored Troops (First North Carolina Colored Volunteers) Taken from the book Andersonville: The Last Depot, available through The University of North Carolina Press (Chapel Hill and London).One passage (which is indicated) is from the book A Brave Black Regiment by Captain Luis F.

Emilio, published by Da Capo Press.Andersonville prison ceased to exist when the War ended in April Some former prisoners remained in Federal service, but most returned to the civilian occupations they had before the War.

During July and AugustClara Barton, along with a detachment of laborers and soldiers, and former prisoner Dorence Atwater, came to Andersonville.According to Dr.

White, the U.S. Government’s prisoner exchange policy had much to do with the deplorable conditions of Andersonville prison because it “ threw upon our impoverished commissariat the feeding of a large number of prisoners.”(3).